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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
challenge question was a, operation weeting, the code name for scotland yard's hacking investigation. scotland yard has a book called "the book," and operations are randomly assigned code names from the book. go to our website for more. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> the headline-grabbing word scandal no longer captures what's happening to rupert murdoch's empire. targets as high as the prime minister and the queen and with one of his top lieutenants arrested in london today, this is a moment of reckoning for journalism. is there really any evidence of misconduct here in the u.s.? are murdoch's critics using this crisis as an excuse to vilify him. our guests include the editor of "the guardian." how much is the press being spun by the president and the republicans. i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." >>> the murdoch media empire is in all-out damage control mode as the scandal at the british papers continues to spread on this side of the atlantic, the fbi opened a preliminary investigation on whether phone hacking
empire. rebekah brooks arrested over the weekend. and has scotland yard resigning over the failures in the investigation. jeffrey kofman joins us this morning from london. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. it's incredible. this scandal unfolding with lightning speed. rupert murdoch's number two arrested. it's fair to say, the air around murdoch himself is getting awfully thin. will where will all of this stop? rupert murdoch has often said he looked on rebekah brooks as his daughter. just a week ago, he indicated that saving her was as important to saving his global empire. but this crisis well beyond his control. brooks, former editor of his now-closed "news of the world," became so toxic, on sunday, she resigned. on sunday she was arrested and questioned about alleged criminal activity while she was at the helm. >> it's very unusual for somebody to be arresteteby appointment on sunday. there could be operational reasons for that. maybe they're going to arrest somebody else today. >> reporter: as the news tightens, the focus turns to his murdoch's son, james. he is ac
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
at london's scotland yard. called before plig politicians answer accusations of systemic incompetence and their answers are telling. >> we know that, there always will be. >> reporter: so who did take bribes? among those questioned, former police officer andy hayman who now writes for "news international." ironic that he led a criticized investigation against the company for phone hacking in 2006. >> while a police officer, did you ever receive payment from any news -- >> good god! absolutely not. i can't believe you suggested that. >> lots of people -- >> come on. absolutely no way. i can say to you -- >> mr. hayman -- >> no, come on, chairman, that's not fair. >> the police woman leading the current investigation into news international phone hacking says the reputation of the entire metropolitan police force is now on the line. >> i think it's everybody's analysis that confidence has been damaged, and i don't -- and i don't doubt if we don't get this right, it will continue to be damaged. >> let's try to get a sense of where this is going. with us the chief washington columnist and
late night, the head of scotland yard, sir paul stephenson became the latest casualty in this phone hacking scandal. for failing to opening an inquiry into the paper. and tomorrow, should be another dramatic day. both murdochs and rebekah brooks to appear in front of parliament to answer questions. robin? >> thank you so much. >>> now, something that we're going to be talking for some time. >> four years at least. we're turning now to team usa's heartbreaking loss to japan in the women's world cup yesterday. the american women had been the favorites going in. if not, sentimental. they hadn't lost to japan in 25 prior matches. twice japan rallied late to tie the score and sending it to penalty kicks and abc's debra roberts in frankfurt where japan won it all. >> reporter: i don't have any finger nails left after that match. in the end it was japan's moment. first asian country to ever claim a world cup title. >> it is japan's world cup! a broken-hearted usa. who thought they had it won twice, are beaten. >> reporter: japan basiced in its own cinderella story. flooding the field in el
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
and kate if they had their choice they would be rambling the highlands of scotland. they are not jalz jazzed by cely at all. they appreciate the value of celebrity, they respect their talent and also l.a. they know people have deep pockets so this weekend is an opportunity to raise money for william's charity. >> we're seeing faces, folks there, jennifer lopez, her husband, marc anthony. anybody else? >> tonight at the event there are 300 people going there, 42 up and coming british talent, the idea is to mingle them with the hollywood movers and shakers, nicole kidman, quentin tarantino, barbra streisand. >> the beckhams. >> they're friends but not pally, pally. william and david were trying to get the world cup in england last year, so they know each other as colleagues, they certainly have got things in common but not like they're popping over there for cocktails before dinner. >> catherine has been getting major kudos for outfits. any special style she'll bring to the l.a. trip. >> i hope so. we've come to expect this from catherine, was wearing an american designer last night, a
states and australia and new zealand and another one from scotland, right? yes, amazing. matthew, you were sleeping, because you got here very early this morning and you were awake for the launch thank goodness, and when you saw it what adjective described it best? >> awesome. >> reporter: i knew that word was coming to mind. are you glad to be part of history? >> yes. >> reporter: and did you ever have dreams of becoming an astronaut? >> yes. >> reporter: do you think that it will still be possible even though this is the last shuttle launch? >> yep. >> reporter: you do. and i will ask your mom that very question, because it was exciting for you, too. >> oh, yeah, it was awesome. >> reporter: and some people think it is the end of the space program, even though other programs on tap, it will be quite some time and maybe not within his lifetime that we will see someone on board something like a space shuttle. what do you think? >> i just hope they continue to go farther ininto space, and keep going, and maybe one day he will be part of it or maybe his kids. >> reporter: do you think t
with scotland yard. >> the news international letters demonstrates that they are cooperating with police inquiries, and have evidence and there was evidence they were cooperating because they were providing. unless you contrary evidence that they were deliberately obstructing you in anyway, you cannot get a production lawyer. there's lawyers at this table i know who will reiterate that. you cannot get evidence, and i'm one of them. >> the reality is you are seeking to blame the legal process for something that is actually the metropolitan police fault, isn't? >> completely disagree with your. >> can i ask you this quick do you know who first recommended mr. wallis to mr. fedorcio? >> i don't know that. >> you didn't make inquiries about that when you were asked? [inaudible] >> did you make inquiries about mr. wallis? wallis? at all from a mr. fedorcio? deana who recommended him speakers i do not recall how it came in this process in terms of who else on the list was responsible for producing the tendering process. i'm sure he said that. i was aware, presumably before 31st of august, 29,
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)